Muslim opression changed me- Yasin Bhatkal


yasinYasin Bhatkal the head of the Indian Mujahideen at the age of 12 had dreamt of becoming a police officer. His teachers in Bhatkal had called him a patriot and even said that there was absolutely nothing to suggest that he would one day become a part of a dirty world of terror.

Police officers who usually break the monotony during their questioning of criminals have been trying to understand what exactly prompted Yasin to join the Indian Mujahideen and turn into probably one of the biggest fanatics this country has seen.

 

Yasin gives an account of how things changed for him. “When I was in school, all I wanted to do was study and earn decently like everyone else. This was my mindset till the age of 18 and not once did I think that I would land into the world of terror and go on to become one of India’s most wanted. During my school days and even back at home I was always asked what I wanted to become when I grew up. My answer always was that I wanted to become a police man so that I could do right for the society and solve crimes. It was a very exciting prospect for me and I really looked forward to joining the police force,” Yasin tells the police.

Over the years that plan however did not materialise and seeing that I was not too bright in studies, my father decided to include me in his business. Between the age of 17 and 18 the discussion with friends started to change and we discussed more about the atrocities against Muslims. Bhatkal town had become very communally sensitive and all of us felt that it was the handiwork of the Hindus to oppress the Muslims. Yasin also said that every evening we used to get together and eventually the topic used to be about atrocities against Muslims. It started off with topics on Bhatkal and then gradually we discussed larger issues which included Palestine and also Kashmir.

However these were just restricted to discussions and I very often came back home and even spoke about these issues. My father sensed that I was changing in my approach and decided to take me with him to Dubai. Over there I met up with a group of people who became my friends eventually. The topics that we discussed were similar to the ones we used to discuss back home. This time around we even discussed Narendra Modi, the Babri Masjid demolition among other issues. My heart used to go out to those Muslims who have been victims of atrocities. I always told my friends that I wanted to be a police man, but today I do not want to tow that line since they are also very much part of the establishment. One of the members of the group who had close link with Riyaz Bhatkal informed him about my line of thinking. Riyaz then contacted me and we had a meeting in Dubai. During that meeting Riyaz asked me about what I wanted to do and he said that there is no point in talking. Attack is the best form of defence and unless this is done and fear is not created, no one will sit up and listen to the Muslims. Riyaz told me that there were big plans and the floating of the Indian Mujahideen was to ensure that voice of the Indian Muslims was heard. The concept interested me and I decided to tow the line, Yasin also said.

The officers investigating him say that he does not have any remorse about his actions. He comes across as a very determined but misguided youth. Even till date he praises those who are part of the Indian Mujahideen and calls them dedicated soldiers espousing the cause of Islam. His ambition to become a police officer is a story he speaks about a lot, but in the very same breath says that he does not regret that he could not lead a normal life. The job assigned to me was done and it shall be continued by someone else. I have no hard feelings or remorse what so ever, Yasin also tells the police.

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8 comments

  1. The definition of Minority should be challenged around the world. How can some religion or faith that is 1st & 2nd largest in the world turn out as a minority, just because there is a small fraction of that population is living in a particular country, which is not ruled by those 2 religions?. As long as their rights are protected then there should be no reason to hang on to minority status. Besides Minority should only be given to those who are ethnically different.

  2. There is no country that calls its citizens minorities especially when they are 200 million in number!!! And to proclaim that they are oppressed is nothing more than sublime to the ridiculous! There are more Hindus in terms of numbers that are more oppressed, more suppressed and more downtrodden than a Muslim of India. Why go by in the name of religion ? There are rich and poor. All from every religion fall in those brackets. Why single out only Muslims as the oppressed from this lot?? The Mega rich in India are Muslims too. Why is there no outcry about that from them? It is partisan medieval orthodox thinking augmented by religious fanaticism and inferiority complex that brings in a thinking of being oppressed! Of course it is nurtured by political ambitions by many that has led to this petty situation, a situation entirely artificial in terms of India. It is enough for these Muslims who feel oppressed to spare a moment and think of their cousins across the border on either side of India, across the ocean on the other side of the world, across the gulf region and everywhere where they are hunting and killing themselves. In comparison, they are best served here in their homeland – India! Can they deny that? And those who deny this are bloody hypocrites slaved in the clutches of a dogma far outdated and austere for the present world to imbibe.

  3. Muslims being oppressed is a nonsensical thought fed into their brains by radicals like Owaisi, I have lot of muslim friends who are doing well, if muslims were discriminated as claimed by this moronic terrorist, then those well off muslims wouldn’t be where they are now. He should be immediately put to death along with his sympathizers, because people like him along with his sympathizers are a grave danger to humanity.

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